funnel

Why It’s Important To Have Full Sales Funnel Visibility

  • April 1, 2019
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While it’s easy to create numerous digital ad campaigns over weeks or months, the more you add, the harder it gets to measure what’s working for you. Given that the point of paying for an ad is to get great results as cheap as you can – how can you keep track?

If you have five different ads, it might not seem as important to have a strategy for how you name campaigns. If, however, one is performing better than the others, you’ll want to capitalize on that. Knowing exactly which campaign and adset or ad is achieving the cheapest results so you can replicate and improve on your winning strategies is easy. It comes down to your naming convention.

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Where are they at in the funnel?

If you are getting started, we recommend naming your campaigns by the stage in the customer journey funnel (awareness/brand, consideration/mid, or conversion) and map your every piece of content to an objective.

Typically, effective relationship building with your customer will align content to these stages in a funnel, aiming to drive people from one stage at the top of the funnel where they first get to know you, through the funnel where you help them understand why they need you, to the bottom where they are incentivized to buy or take action now.

Why is it important to focus on this? If your business is not getting a great amount of sales or leads, you need to know where in the customer journey people are dropping off. With the ability to track results daily, you can optimize your strategy at the right level.

You can also include other identifying data like the audience you have selected e.g. age, their location and an identifying element of campaign creative.

Example of “Broad”, “Middle” and “Bottom” campaigns for a client in August. The graphs filtered to measure specific metrics per Funnel segment.

By measuring against the funnel objective, you can see what is working for you and what isn’t. If your platform, like Digivizer, makes it easy to filter, there is no reason why you can’t be in a continuous state of test and learn. Since all digital can be measured, you can easily set up your real-time marketing lab, testing different pieces of content, call-to-actions, and audiences until you get your lowest cost per result.

What could it look like?

If you learn that emojis in bullet form can generate better results in ads on Facebook, you may want to try it out, so you add in emojis to some of your ads and watch the results. Testing is crucial in advertising, so by nature, you will always be making more ads to improve on what you’ve done before.

Without a naming convention, if you look back on your campaign list two weeks later, you’re not sure at a glance which ones had the emojis in them and which content is working best. Was it Campaign 4432320? Or Campaign 4432321?

Using the advice above, your naming convention could get rid of this confusion. For example, your naming convention could look something like: Brand 35-45 YR FEM QLD  Life is Better Chris Video 45

  • Brand = objective
  • 35-45 YR FEM =  age and gender
  • QLD = location
  • Life is Better = name
  • Chris = Product name
  • Video = content type
  • 45 = which version (45 seconds in this case)

Learning over time

Once you’ve set up your naming convention, make sure you stick to it. That’s how you can quickly look back at your results – even if you add new team members – and know that if you trial new things in the future, you have an easy reference of what you’ve tried before.

Naming conventions in your advertising help you aggregate data and compare different tactics. Without it, you can’t see the trees for the forest, because they will be lost in a ton of data.

With Digivizer, we want to help you understand your investment in digital marketing. Do more of what works and less of what doesn’t.